From sustainable shopping to ethical data, meet the all-female founders at Google Campus's new start-up residency

Front row from L-R: Inas Ismail, Dr Rayna Patel, Veronica Sule, Siddhi Mittal, Heinin Zhang Second row: Sahil Sethi, Mariama Boumanjal, Georgina Kirby, Beth Chapman, Abbie Morris, Shardi Nahavandi, Dana Latouff, Rahel Tesfai Back row: Megan Worthing-Davies, Federico Mori, Marta Krupinska, James Omisakin ( Shariq Siddiqui, Google for Startups Campus London )

Front row from L-R: Inas Ismail, Dr Rayna Patel, Veronica Sule, Siddhi Mittal, Heinin Zhang Second row: Sahil Sethi, Mariama Boumanjal, Georgina Kirby, Beth Chapman, Abbie Morris, Shardi Nahavandi, Dana Latouff, Rahel Tesfai Back row: Megan Worthing-Davies, Federico Mori, Marta Krupinska, James Omisakin ( Shariq Siddiqui, Google for Startups Campus London )

The tech industry knows women were left behind in the late Noughties revolution that spawned firms such as Facebook and Twitter and those effects are still being felt today.

Venture capital firm Atomico’s State of European Tech report found that 93 per cent of VC funds raised in 2018 went to all-male teams, whereas only one per cent went to all-female companies. 

“We know this is not because female founders are less able, just the opposite. There’s a plethora of stats that show diverse founding teams bring better financial results, and diversity breeds innovation, which is critical to success in business,” says Marta Krupinska, head of Google for Startups UK (she co-founded the successful international money transfer start-up Azimo before moving to work for the tech giant).

“So we thought, what if we bring together some of the brilliant entrepreneurs working on the world’s most important problems?”

This led to the new Female Founders programme at Google Campus in Shoreditch. Led by programme manager Mariama Boumanjal, it has been a six-week-long sprint of workshops and mentorship, so the founders can learn everything about start-up life. It’s a diverse bunch in terms of company ideas, backgrounds and even languages spoken but they all have one aim in common: to lead a successful tech company. 

Read more by Amelia Heathman at Evening Standard