Home books 31 Children’s Books to Support Conversations on Race, Racism, and Resistance

31 Children’s Books to Support Conversations on Race, Racism, and Resistance

As early as 3–6 months of age, babies begin to notice and express preference by race (Bar-Haim, 2006). Between the ages of 3 and 5, children begin to apply stereotypes, categorize people by race, and express racial bias (Winkler, 2009). White North American children begin to report negative explicit attitudes toward people of color as early as age 3 (Baron, 2006). By age 3, children also use racist language intentionally — and use it to create social hierarchies, evoke emotional reactions in people of color, and produce harmful results (Van Ausdale, 2001). By 6 years of age, children demonstrate a pro-white/anti-Black bias (Baron, 2006). Adolescents, when looking at Black people’s faces, show higher levels of activity in the area of the brain known for its fight-flight reactions (Telzer, 2013).

To counter racist socialization and racial bias, experts recommend acknowledging and naming race and racism with children as early and as often as possible. Children’s books are one of the most effective and practical tools for initiating these critical conversations, and can also be used to model what it means to resist and dismantle oppression.

Beyond addressing issues of race and racism, this children’s reading list focuses on taking action. It highlights resistance, resilience and activism; and seeks to empower youth to participate in the ongoing movement for racial justice. Children not only need to know what individual, institutional, and internalized racism looks like, they need to know what they can do about it.

These books showcase the many ways people of all ages and races have worked to disrupt racism, and highlight how race intersects with other issues, such as capitalism, class, and colonization. The majority of books center BIPOC, whose lives and bodies have been on the front lines of racial justice work, yet whose stories often go untold. The essential work of white activists is also included — to underscore that anti-racist work is not the responsibility of BIPOC; and exemplify the ways white people have stood up against racial injustice. This list was curated by critical literacy organizations, The Conscious Kid and American Indians in Children’s Literature . . .

Read the full list at Medium

- Advertisment -

Most Popular

Learning Beyond Black History Month: Tips for Parents

Each February gives us a chance to be intentional with our actions in learning about Black History, but we shouldn't stop there. We should...

Raising Kids as Allies During Black History Month

Most folks would be able to instantly identify images of these Black cultural icons like President Barack Obama, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., or...

Social Justice and Advocacy: How One Person is Making a Difference

Social justice is the idea of a justified distribution of resources among individuals in a society. It’s about rights, humanity, equality and equity. It...

How a {Free} Board Game is Helping Fight Racism

Martin Luther King Jr. Day is upon us. Today marks the day we celebrate his life and his teachings. A leader who fought for racial...

Recent Comments

Registration

Forgotten Password?